Andrei Sakharov’s “Thoughts on progress, peaceful coexistence and intellectual freedom” (Book Review)

Many know of Andrei Sakharov (1921-1989) as a Soviet dissident, a Nobel laureate, an activist for disarmament, peace, and human rights. Of course he was also a nuclear physicist and the designer of the first two-stage hydrogen bomb, first tested on 22 November 1955 with a nominal yield of approximately 3 megatons. However, almost unknown in the West are his philosophical visions on humanity, history, the Cold War, and the future of humanity. His visions, concepts and theories he presented in 1968 in the short book, “Thoughts on progress, peaceful coexistence and intellectual freedom” and in some other shorter works.

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Author Ridvan Bari Urcosta
Senior Analyst at Strategy&Future
Date 30/07/2021
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